Cell Phone Forensics

Home » Cell Phone Forensics

Updated Standards and Best Practice Guides in IRIS Digital Evidence Toolbox

When digital evidence is encountered during an investigation, many questions arise: What is the best method to preserve the evidence? How should the evidence be handled? How should valuable or potentially relevant data contained be preserved? The key to answering these questions begins with a firm understanding of the characteristics of digital evidence. Organizations comprised of digital forensics experts such as National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), the National Institute of Justice (NIJ), and Scientific Working Group for Digital Evidence (SWGDE) have published guides for ensuring quality and consistency within the forensic community. IRIS LLC has updated our Digital Evidence Toolbox with the newest Standards and Best Practices from SWGDE along with other free tools and resources for the legal professional.

2018-07-26T09:51:41+00:00July 25th, 2018|Categories: Cell Phone Forensics, Computer Forensics, Crime Scene Examination, Investigations, Standards-Best Practices|Comments Off on Updated Standards and Best Practice Guides in IRIS Digital Evidence Toolbox

Advanced Cell Site Analysis Using Per Call Measurement Data

Location data from cellular service provider records can be key evidence in a case.  In this article we discuss how a mobile device works on a cellular network, the types of location data that can be obtained from the cellular service provider, and links to the latest subpoena guide and retention schedules for the major service providers. Read Full Article Here>

2018-08-02T14:51:04+00:00July 10th, 2018|Categories: Cell Phone Forensics, Investigations, Location Data|Tags: , , , , , , |Comments Off on Advanced Cell Site Analysis Using Per Call Measurement Data

Case Study: Early Assessment and the use of Cell Site Records

Previously overlooked cell site records containing location data were used to exonerate a man after 17 years in jail. In 2000, teenager Vernon Horn was convicted for a January 1999 robbery and murder at a New Haven neighborhood convenience store.  17 years later cell site records were used to set aside the conviction. Read the Full Article Here>

2018-07-03T14:51:49+00:00July 3rd, 2018|Categories: Cell Phone Forensics, Investigations, Location Data|Tags: , , |Comments Off on Case Study: Early Assessment and the use of Cell Site Records

What attorneys and investigators need to know about cell provider records and their retention

Effective use of location data begins with having the knowledge of what information to get and where to find it.  But the most important thing to know is that it is time sensitive so it must be prioritized early. Cellular service providers have location data records you may not have considered.  These records can be a significant source of information, but are more time sensitive than other records because of each providers record retention.  For example, when a person is travelling, and their mobile device is idle, the device could be connecting to roaming networks, Wi-Fi hotspots, cell site towers, etc.  Each of these actions leaves a footprint of locations that are contained in unique service provider records. “Harness the power of knowledge.” We explain what service provider records are available, how long they are kept and how to get them.  We combined these free resources and more in our IRIS LLC Digital Evidence Toolbox.  These resources include an up-to-date subpoena guide for all the major cellular and internet service providers.  They also include updated 2018 retention schedules for the main cellular service providers and descriptions of the types of records to request. Read Full Article Here Click Here for the IRIS DIGITAL EVIDENCE TOOLBOX

2018-07-03T11:56:34+00:00June 26th, 2018|Categories: Cell Phone Forensics|Tags: , |Comments Off on What attorneys and investigators need to know about cell provider records and their retention

Supreme Court protects digital privacy of cellphone location records

(Photo: Michael Owens, USA Today) In a ruling that could have broad implications for privacy rights in the digital age, justices on both sides of the ideological spectrum said rapid advances in technology make decades-old rules on data privacy inadequate. It was another in a series of digital privacy verdicts issued by the Supreme Court, following rulings in recent years that police cannot use GPS equipment to track vehicles or search cellphones without a warrant.  See full USA Today article>

2018-07-03T14:03:42+00:00June 22nd, 2018|Categories: Cell Phone Forensics, Digital Privacy, Investigations|Comments Off on Supreme Court protects digital privacy of cellphone location records

Bridgeport Man Found Not Guilty of Stratford Rape

  A Bridgeport man, who spent nine and a half months in prison after a woman claimed he raped her in a Stratford motel, was found not guilty of the charges. Mr. Joseph’s defense team reported that the cell phone evidence recovered by IRIS LLC was a crucial part of the defense. When IRIS LLC initially received Mr. Joseph's phone it was heavily damaged and not operational, but we were able to repair the phone so that the text message evidence could be successfully extracted and provided to the defense team. See Full Article>

2018-06-14T16:37:24+00:00May 21st, 2018|Categories: Cell Phone Forensics, Investigations|Tags: , , , |Comments Off on Bridgeport Man Found Not Guilty of Stratford Rape

IRIS LLC Hosts Training for the CT Division of Public Defender Services

Thank you to everyone from the Connecticut Division of Public Defender Services who attended our latest digital forensics training seminar in Hartford, CT on Thursday, April 5, 2018.  It was a great opportunity to share our vision of promoting a universal standard for managing cell phone forensic extraction reports and preserving social media evidence in accordance with the best practices and industry standards. Harness the power of knowledge - Free guide and other investigative resources available in our Digital Evidence Toolbox: http://www.irisinvestigations.com/wordpress/iris-digital-evidence-toolbox/

2018-04-17T16:03:35+00:00April 16th, 2018|Categories: Cell Phone Forensics, Social Media, Training|Tags: , , |Comments Off on IRIS LLC Hosts Training for the CT Division of Public Defender Services

The Best Data Security and Identity Theft Prevention Methods for 2018

Be proactive and know what the crooks need to rip you off.  Identify vulnerable points and take measures to protect yourself against identity theft.  An ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure.  You lock your door, why not your mail box?  But why stop there? What about your email box and all the devices and vulnerable points in-between. Read Full Article>

Can Police Track You Through Your Cellphone Without A Warrant?

The U.S. Supreme Court confronts the digital age again on Wednesday when it hears oral arguments in a case that promises to have major repercussions for law enforcement and personal privacy. At issue is whether police have to get a search warrant in order to obtain cellphone location information that is routinely collected and stored by wireless providers. See full article>

2018-04-17T12:47:04+00:00November 28th, 2017|Categories: Cell Phone Forensics, Investigations|Comments Off on Can Police Track You Through Your Cellphone Without A Warrant?

Chain of Custody: How to Ensure Digital Evidence Stands Up In Court

Digital evidence is evidence. It can have real impact on legal proceedings. So just as with physical evidence, it’s essential that law enforcement maintain a clear, documented chain of custody, just as it would for any other physical evidence. From the moment evidence is obtained, a trail must document how it has been handled, by whom, and for what purpose. Read More>

2018-04-17T12:47:37+00:00November 21st, 2017|Categories: Cell Phone Forensics, Computer Forensics, Investigations|Comments Off on Chain of Custody: How to Ensure Digital Evidence Stands Up In Court

FBI rebuts reports that county reset San Bernardino shooter’s iCloud password without consent

The FBI on Saturday rebutted media reports that San Bernardino County technicians acted without the agency's consent when they reset the password for the Apple iCloud account belonging to one of the shooters involved in the Dec. 2 terror attack at a county facility that killed 14 people. “This is not true,” FBI spokeswoman Laura Eimiller said in a statement released late Saturday night. “FBI investigators worked cooperatively with the county of San Bernardino in order to exploit crucial data contained in the iCloud account associated with a county-issued iPhone that was assigned to the terror suspect, Syed Rizwan Farook.” Apple has refused to give the FBI the tools to unlock Farook’s iPhone, and the battle escalated Friday when the government urged a federal judge to immediately compel the tech giant to comply, arguing that it appears more concerned with marketing strategy than national security. Separately on Friday, federal prosecutors and senior Apple executives also disclosed new details about what transpired privately in the weeks leading up to their very public legal battle, including their previous efforts to access the phone’s content. Apple's fight with the FBI Apple said that in early January it provided four alternatives to access data from the iPhone besides the controversial method the FBI is now proposing. But one of the most encouraging options was ruled out after the phone’s owner – Farook’s employer, the San Bernardino County Public Health Department – reset the password to his iCloud account in order to access data from the backup, according to Apple officials. That means the iCloud password on the iPhone itself is now wrong, and it won’t back up unless someone can get past the phone’s passcode and change it. The issue was [...]

2018-04-17T12:18:42+00:00February 22nd, 2016|Categories: Cell Phone Forensics, Computer Forensics|Tags: , , , , , , |Comments Off on FBI rebuts reports that county reset San Bernardino shooter’s iCloud password without consent

Congress to Consider Encryption after Apple Refuses to Build ‘Backdoor’

Reversing course, a key congressman said lawmakers will need to step into the debate over encryption vs. privacy after Apple said it would oppose a court order demanding it help the FBI hack a spree killer’s cell phone. Rep. Adam Schiff (D-California) had previously said a legislative approach to the encryption debate was not feasible. But in a statement Wednesday, Schiff said the questions posed by the Apple case “will ultimately need to be resolved by Congress, the administration and industry, rather than the courts alone,” according to a Reuters report. Schiff is the top Democrat on the House Intelligence Committee. The iPhone of San Bernardino mass killer Syed Farook remains locked in the FBI’s possession. Farook and his wife Tashfeen Malik allegedly killed 14 people and wounded 21 others at the Inland Regional Center in San Bernardino, Calif., on Dec. 2. Of particular interest to detectives is an 18-minute window in which authorities cannot account for the two killers’ whereabouts. The couple was chased down and killed in a shootout roughly two hours after the massacre. James Comey, director of the FBI, told the Senate Intelligence Committee’s annual Hearing on Worldwide Threats earlier this month that Farook’s work-issued phone remained locked. READ MORE: FBI Struggles to Crack San Bernardino Terrorist’s Encrypted Phone, Two Months Later “We still have one of those killers’ phones that we have not been able to open,” he said. “It’s been over two months, we’re still working on it.” The White House abandoned a push for encryption-access legislation last year, amid outcry from privacy advocates and opposition from industry players, according to Reuters. Reuters also reported that the House Judiciary Committee has scheduled a hearing on encryption for March 1 [...]

2018-04-17T13:40:35+00:00February 22nd, 2016|Categories: Cell Phone Forensics, Computer Forensics|Tags: , , , , , |Comments Off on Congress to Consider Encryption after Apple Refuses to Build ‘Backdoor’

Apple Rejects Court Order for ‘Master Key’ into San Bernardino Shooter’s iPhone

Apple will fight a federal judge’s order to help crack the locked iPhone of one of the San Bernardino shooters, the CEO said in a letter to customers Wednesday. The unlocking of the single cell phone would involve new software that would create a “master key, capable of opening hundreds of millions of locks,” essentially forming new cybersecurity problems, according to Tim Cook, Apple CEO. “The U.S. government has asked us for something we simply do not have, and something we consider too dangerous to create. They have asked us to be build a backdoor to the iPhone,” Cook said in his statement. “In the wrong hands, this software – which does not exist today – would have the potential to unlock any iPhone in someone’s physical possession.” Of particular interest to detectives is a window of approximately 18 minutes, in which, authorities cannot account for the two killers’ whereabouts. The couple was chased down and killed in a shootout roughly two hours after they allegedly killed 14 people and wounded 21 others at the Inland Regional Center in San Bernardino, Calif., on Dec. 2. James Comey, director of the FBI, told the Senate Intelligence Committee's annual Hearing on Worldwide Threats last week that Bureau experts had been unable to crack open the Farook phone. Source: Apple Rejects Court Order for 'Master Key' into San Bernardino Shooter’s iPhone

2018-04-17T13:23:39+00:00February 22nd, 2016|Categories: Cell Phone Forensics, Computer Forensics|Comments Off on Apple Rejects Court Order for ‘Master Key’ into San Bernardino Shooter’s iPhone

Police Need a Warrant to Search Cell Phones, Justices Say

In an emphatic defense of privacy in the digital age, a unanimous Supreme Court ruled Wednesday that police generally may not search the cellphones of people they arrest without first getting search warrants. Cellphones are unlike anything else police may find on someone they arrest, Chief Justice John Roberts wrote for the court. They are "not just another technological convenience," he said, but ubiquitous, increasingly powerful computers that contain vast quantities of personal, sensitive information. "With all they contain and all they may reveal, they hold for many Americans the privacies of life," Roberts declared. So the message to police about what they should do before rummaging through a cellphone's contents following an arrest is simple: "Get a warrant." The chief justice acknowledged that barring searches would affect law enforcement, but he said: "Privacy comes at a cost." By ruling as it did, the court chose not to extend earlier decisions from the 1970s— when cellphone technology was not yet available — that allow police to empty a suspect's pockets and examine whatever they find to ensure officers' safety and prevent the destruction of evidence. The Obama administration and the state of California, defending cellphone searches, said the phones should have no greater protection from a search than anything else police find. But the defendants in the current cases, backed by civil libertarians, librarians and news media groups, argued that cellphones, especially smartphones, can store troves of sensitive personal information. "By recognizing that the digital revolution has transformed our expectations of privacy, today's decision is itself revolutionary and will help to protect the privacy rights of all Americans," said American Civil Liberties Union legal director Steven Shapiro. Under the Constitution's Fourth Amendment, police generally need [...]

2018-04-17T13:27:15+00:00November 11th, 2014|Categories: Cell Phone Forensics|Comments Off on Police Need a Warrant to Search Cell Phones, Justices Say